News and Updates

We've designed a number of ways to connect with, and listen to, as many voices and ideas as possible. We can't thank everyone enough for being part of building our 7-year vision.

But we can definitely share the journey!

Stay tuned to this page for the news and updates that capture our story to Providence 2026.


We've designed a number of ways to connect with, and listen to, as many voices and ideas as possible. We can't thank everyone enough for being part of building our 7-year vision.

But we can definitely share the journey!

Stay tuned to this page for the news and updates that capture our story to Providence 2026.


  • Highlights from the Diabetes Health Centre team

    3 months ago
    Feature resized diabetes

    Monday, December 10 saw a number of staff from Diabetes Health Centre at St. Paul’s stop by and offer up their insights, both from the perspective of their role as well as from a system and transformation point of view.


    Below are just a few* highlights from ideas and feedback that this team added to our pursuit of world class:

    • I think we support our patients really well -- we embrace patients who are more challenging and offer them flexibility and compassion, whereas other organizations might turn them away or not offer the same accommodation.
    • It’s important to...

    Monday, December 10 saw a number of staff from Diabetes Health Centre at St. Paul’s stop by and offer up their insights, both from the perspective of their role as well as from a system and transformation point of view.


    Below are just a few* highlights from ideas and feedback that this team added to our pursuit of world class:

    • I think we support our patients really well -- we embrace patients who are more challenging and offer them flexibility and compassion, whereas other organizations might turn them away or not offer the same accommodation.
    • It’s important to try to be an open accepting space where patients feel safe to share; it allows us to build that rapport and eliminate the power dynamic.
    • Too much decision-making that directly impacts departments gets done without engagement with that department.
    • If you don't have enough staff, you don't have enough time to go the extra mile. Not to be understaffed is the key thing. We're just going to get busier so I think the organization really needs to keep on top of volume and staff programs accordingly. If you can talk to patients more and have more time to understand what they need, we could triage more effectively. It's about getting more information from our patients and finding out what the exact issue is.
    • I’ve worked in two health authorities and I found it was harder to go through the system here to be on-boarded as an employee here, e.g., having to get an ID, email set-up, etc.
    • Work-life balance, especially for parents, is lacking. It's hard to maintain balance if there is no part-time roles. If I had a part-time line, I feel like that would make a difference for me.
    • St. Paul’s Foundation has been very supportive to help us buy things that we've needed.
    • I find that there are a lot of opportunities for growth and education, and people are encouraged to move around and grow. I think that's why people stay here.
    • I think it's good that the CEO moved to St. Paul’s. She can really see what happens here that way.
    • Working in different clinics has shown me that there are many different processes for getting to the same result. One clinic does it one way and one does it another. Consistency across our processes would help.
    • We are one of the first to have an insulin pump program. First the technology came on the scene and then Health Canada started to cover it for adults. But then there was a gap because in the past you would have been trained by the company supplying the pumps. And so we recognized this gap for our patients, created a solution and were a leader in this area.
    • Before patients couldn't go out and buy a pill – but now they can go out and buy technology. We have patients who are buying Apple watches and are coming to us to know how this can support their care. We need to stay on top of it and know how to use it. Technology will mean we will need to partner with private companies to understand how we can support our patients.
    • I think if we had more funding, our patients would be more autonomous. I think 90% of patients forget what they're taught so if they were able to access something that could prompt or remind them, it would lead to empowerment.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitator!


    This recent session with Diabetes Health Centre staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.


  • Eating disorders program help to guide PHC's future

    3 months ago
    Ed pop up feature resize2

    On the afternoon of December 7, staff from the provincial adult tertiary eating disorders program, which is housed at St. Paul's, came and went during a 2-hour pop-up engagement session (i.e., when we bring candy and questions to the unit).

    From suggestions on how staff can make care more real for their patients, to the research they're proud of, to where they see opportunities to grow, clinical and medical staff came to the table with many great ideas.

    Here is just a snippet*:

    • We need to bring the health care we're teaching here out into the community.

    • I think what...

    On the afternoon of December 7, staff from the provincial adult tertiary eating disorders program, which is housed at St. Paul's, came and went during a 2-hour pop-up engagement session (i.e., when we bring candy and questions to the unit).

    From suggestions on how staff can make care more real for their patients, to the research they're proud of, to where they see opportunities to grow, clinical and medical staff came to the table with many great ideas.

    Here is just a snippet*:

    • We need to bring the health care we're teaching here out into the community.

    • I think what could make us world class in the next seven years is developing our understanding of men and body image, and creating specific programming around it -- we are seeing more and more men come through but I've only seen one pamphlet dedicated specifically to men and eating disorders.

    • There is a big research component to our program -- when someone is first referred we ask them to complete a survey and again when they're taken in as an inpatient, and again when they're discharged so that we can improve based on this patient feedback. An example of this improvement is patient participation rounds: The psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker -- the whole team is present and participates. We're now also writing down the feedback shared during rounds for our patients because of survey insights. We were realizing that it was just the negative that our patients were holding onto and we wanted to make sure they that they saw all of the good being said about them, too.

    • We’re the only provincial tertiary-level resource for eating disorders, and through that we run a comprehensive provincial program for BC and the Yukon. Our program is very research-informed and evidence-based, and our staff are seconded to write the BC clinical guidelines for eating disorders, which we get international calls about. We're both medical and psychiatric, which makes us fairly unique, with 3 internists who rotate through here, and are available 24/7. Everyone probably knows we're doing cardiac transplants, but do they know we have the only adult provincial inpatient program? More institutional visibility would be really valuable.

    • This hospital is colourful; it serves all walks of life -- we accept everyone. That's what I like about it.

    • It would be great if we were able to do our own cooking for our patients so that they could have more input. The hospital only has so many food options.

    • Providing patients with immersion experiences that will help them navigate real-life situations like going out for dinner or experiencing social events -- those situations that are really anxiety-ridden for our patients -- would set us apart. It would be more money but at the end of the day if you work towards recovery and keep a patient out of inpatient and in recovery, the additional cost for these types of experiences would be worth it.

    • It sometimes feels like a lot of people in the organization don't even know we’re here. We are kind of invisible, like we get forgotten about when it comes to distributing certain supplies like whiteboards at bedside.

    • I put out one email and I get 20 replies. It sounds cheesy but it's very friendly here -- like a family.

    • What I've learned here is the necessity of matching right patient, right care, right time.

    • Feel of a community hospital with all of the services. I know the docs who I need to contact with, and it's very easy to facilitate these conversations.

    • Our unit has a great housekeeper but the rest of the hospital isn't that. The patients that have been cared for here, or the staff can look past it -- but your first impression of this hospital is far from great; abysmal, even.

    • I think that regardless of your position you are encouraged to contribute and be part of the organization and the work here. The hospital doesn't feel elitist.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!


    This recent session with Eating Disorders Program staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize




  • Researchers share their vision for the future of PHC

    3 months ago
    Research session


    On December 7, members of the Providence Health Care research community gathered in the Gourlay conference room at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital for coffee, lunch and a very important conversation about the future of our organization.

    After a presentation about PHC’s 7-year strategic plan, participants broke into groups to discuss several big questions that will guide our organization’s work until 2026.

    Several key insights came up during the engagement session:

    • Active clinical programs are necessary in order to study patients and we have to brand ourselves as a good place to do clinical research.
    • ...


    On December 7, members of the Providence Health Care research community gathered in the Gourlay conference room at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital for coffee, lunch and a very important conversation about the future of our organization.

    After a presentation about PHC’s 7-year strategic plan, participants broke into groups to discuss several big questions that will guide our organization’s work until 2026.

    Several key insights came up during the engagement session:

    • Active clinical programs are necessary in order to study patients and we have to brand ourselves as a good place to do clinical research.
    • We have an inquisitive and collaborative environment and should maintain this.
    • The new St. Paul’s must consider space for research and research expansion. We should work with UBC as we build the new research facility.
    • There’s no way SPH can do everything, so we must focus on set clinical areas (i.e. heart/lung, HIV/AIDS) and use those patients to advance research.
    • It’s important to maintain our areas of research specialization, otherwise we will have to compete for funding and resources with other institutions.
    • Encourage temporary students and post-docs to stay before they move on to other research institutions.
    • To retain good people, we need salary support for mid- and senior-level investigators. Younger generations of researchers are attracted to work with senior researchers they admire.
    • Patient access at St. Paul’s is good and we are able to conduct clinical trials well here. We wouldn’t be able to conduct clinical trials as well outside the hospital.
    • We have to be physically connected to the hospital and clinicians and researchers must work on the same site. UBC is a “dead zone” clinically because there is poor patient access.

    * Please note: these are but a few of the comments heard and ideas discussed - all sentiments were fully captured by the facilitators and will be rolled up into the findings shared with SLT.

    This recent session with researchers and research staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize


  • COG collaborates on our way forward

    3 months ago
    Feature image group resize

    On December 5, our Clinical Operations Group (COG) opened up time on their agenda to have a dedicated conversation around our 7-year strategic plan, and what needs to happen between now and 2026 for our pursuit of world class to feel like a success.

    Across four tables, more than 20 leaders reflected on what’s working, what’s not working, and shared the ideas on how to bridge the gap between the two.

    Several key insights * came up during the session:

    • Cost of living will be a challenge going forward. Affordable housing, onsite and/or subsidized daycare, parking that’s strategically placed --...

    On December 5, our Clinical Operations Group (COG) opened up time on their agenda to have a dedicated conversation around our 7-year strategic plan, and what needs to happen between now and 2026 for our pursuit of world class to feel like a success.

    Across four tables, more than 20 leaders reflected on what’s working, what’s not working, and shared the ideas on how to bridge the gap between the two.

    Several key insights * came up during the session:

    • Cost of living will be a challenge going forward. Affordable housing, onsite and/or subsidized daycare, parking that’s strategically placed -- maybe even free for staff? – placed all the way along the street to the new hospital.
    • There are a lot of pockets where research is being done but we're not bringing this work out on a national or international stage. Because of funding, people are very hesitant to travel for conferences. We're limiting ourselves.
    • This is a really hard place to work but we know everyone has one another's backs.
    • Fiona's blog makes me feel valued in the work that I do. She sees the importance of the soft, the intangible touches of our work.
    • We've become very innovative in tackling issues even if it's not what everyone else might do; we're responsive. Providence is willing to go the extra mile, jump in, and honour our commitment to social justice.
    • We honour our history and it is a point of pride for us. I still feel a lot of pride about how we responded to the HIV/AIDS crisis.
    • Financial performance is our biggest risk.
    • There are so many competing priorities. We're told to be innovative but then there’s always another ask or more work. It feels like mixed messages.
    • We provide care and nurture the spiritual beliefs of everyone, regardless of their faith. We need to be clear on that. We create space for everyone’s spirituality.
    • In the media, there are a lot of stories about the things that we don’t do that could potentially turn people off of the need for Catholic health care. We need to message that it’s not that we don't do it -- we just facilitate other ways of accomplishing our patients’ wishes.
    • It's about the whole person -- it's an observational difference.
    • We have compassion and social justice at the forefront, so it gives us a gateway into that type of care. This sets us apart from what is traditionally delivered in health care.
    • Be proactive, versus reactive.
    • Important for us to look at our current workforce and be able to offer more flexibility, whether that’s job-sharing or different shifts rotations.
    • Build connections with community where we're not just about medical connections but social ones. We see a person, and all of the factors that make-up their health.
    • All of us should be employees of the organization.
    • Yes, we do provide care to a unique population – but to do that effectively, we need to support our people. And if they don't feel that support here, then they're just coming to their shift to punch in and get a paycheque but they're not doing anything extra.
    • In-the-moment recognition is important. Maybe every program has a slush fund that we can use to buy gift cards or coffees to recognize others with?
    • Some programs have money for professional development and other areas say no. That impacts culture.
    • Thinking about palliative care as a model of care that's integrated with other services, encompasses a person's health goals. An upstream, complementary approach.
    • There's a lot of rah-rah but if you talk to someone who is giving care on the front line that likely isn’t their perception.
    • So much happens here in silos. Like dissemination of information. Or different pockets of money for different programs. The specialty areas are focused on their single population but not what's going on across the organization. It creates a have-have-not environment.
    * Please note: these are but a few of the comments heard and ideas discussed - all sentiments were fully captured by the lead and table facilitators and will be rolled up into the findings shared with SLT.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize


  • ED staff add their insights

    3 months ago
    Ed pop up dec42018 feature

    With 12 hours of work behind them or 12 hours still ahead, a group of ED staff carved out time on December 4 to discuss what’s working, what’s not, and bring their valuable ideas, insights, and compassion for the people they serve to the table.

    Here are some* high-level comments that we heard:

    • To be world class we need more in-person engagement between senior leadership and the frontline so that senior leaders can see and better understand what’s happening for staff, and frontline staff can better understand/know what the big vision is that’s driving the organization. There’s more value to...

    With 12 hours of work behind them or 12 hours still ahead, a group of ED staff carved out time on December 4 to discuss what’s working, what’s not, and bring their valuable ideas, insights, and compassion for the people they serve to the table.

    Here are some* high-level comments that we heard:

    • To be world class we need more in-person engagement between senior leadership and the frontline so that senior leaders can see and better understand what’s happening for staff, and frontline staff can better understand/know what the big vision is that’s driving the organization. There’s more value to these exchanges happening face-to-face.
    • Recruitment is important – but we also need to build on and invest in the people that are here.
    • Work enhances life -- not the other way around. We need to change the traditional approach. Give people the hours they need and they will stay.
    • Burnout is an issue. Overtime is almost the same as sick time. Staff work overtime because they want to support the department, but then they're burnt out and get sick. It creates a cycle.
    • St. Paul’s is the only hospital with social justice as our mandate. It's pretty unique. It's why I chose to apply to and work at this hospital.
    • When I worked overseas, the organization gave everyone who worked in the city an extra $200-pounds /month because it was so expensive to work there. Vancouver is getting to that point, too. The stipend didn’t cover expenses but the gesture made a difference.
    • We need to do more advertising on social media – I see ads for Fraser all across my social media. Take advantage of where people already are.
    • Developing our own robust debriefing system would be beneficial. Right now, following a traumatic event, it's actually Victims Services with VPD that get brought in.
    • We need someone with addictions medicine training on the floor 24/7. We constantly have patients to refer but have to keep people in the ED overnight until the RAAC opens the next morning.
    • In 7 years, the DTES might not exist as we currently know it -- how will that impact our special populations? How are we keeping our eyes on the next thing?
    • SafeRide only runs until 2am and then our patients have nowhere to go. We need more wraparound systems to support these patients -- otherwise they leave, and they're back at the ED that next night.
    • What is in place to support our staff’s mental health and wellness, like a gym? Is there a plan for this for the new hospital?
    • What about a satellite pharmacy in the ED?
    • What's the plan to get through the next 7 years until we move, infrastructure-wise?
    • We need to better connect emergency care to what's happening in addictions research. To be aware of new techniques and findings that are being used to care for our patents with substance-use disorder would innovate what we’re currently doing. We could be at the forefront of this – people already want to copy our ABSU [Adult Behavioural Stabilization Unit] model.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by facilitator Josephine Jung, corporate director, Strategic Management.


    This recent session with ED staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31st! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering to join the conversation online also gets your name added for a huge prize draw happening the week of December 10. Don’t miss out on your chance to win a dinner with Fiona, an Amazon Echo, an espresso maker and so much more! See what's up for grabs.

  • Crosstown Joins the Conversation

    3 months ago
    Crosstown engagement feature

    On December 3, Crosstown staff and medical staff used their shift change as an opportunity to congregate in the clinic waiting room and discuss important questions about Providence’s future. The conversation was lively and the comments exemplified why Crosstown staff are the very best at what they do: they are always advocating for their patients, and know the tools they need more of to deliver the best treatment to their patients.

    Here are some* of the ideas and comments that Crosstown staff added to our pursuit of world class.

    On December 3, Crosstown staff and medical staff used their shift change as an opportunity to congregate in the clinic waiting room and discuss important questions about Providence’s future. The conversation was lively and the comments exemplified why Crosstown staff are the very best at what they do: they are always advocating for their patients, and know the tools they need more of to deliver the best treatment to their patients.

    Here are some* of the ideas and comments that Crosstown staff added to our pursuit of world class.

    • Why do we work here? Because it’s a necessary area – as staff we have a feeling that we need to be here. We have to be. If not us, who? The patients need us.
    • We're limited by funding by the number of people we serve; we currently serve 130 – but have a 500-person waiting list. We could be serving 4x the number of people.
    • Substance use is a health problem and can be managed and is part of the continuing of care. We manage diabetes with insulin; we can manage substance use with medication.
    • It would be great to be able to offer primary care to our patients, in addition to the treatment that we offer here.
    • What’s needed for us to be world-class? A new facility that is purpose-built and would serve the expansion of the program. The current location is ideal -- a renovation, maybe, or a new location but Crosstown needs to stay in this neighbourhood.
    • Develop closer partnerships with housing, Vancouver Police Department, overdose prevention sites, drug court, InSite, etc.
    • Listen to staff in order to stay innovative.
    • We need to provide a platform for greatness - allow people to grow and flourish.
    • There needs to be a policy mandating everyone to take trauma-informed care -- security, medical staff, clinical staff. Everyone.
    • As of May 19, 2018, Health Canada has given us permission to transport and offer diacetylmorphine (prescription heroin) to all clients so, for example, a surgery patient can have medication delivered to them. We would like diacetylmorphine to be accessible to clients who need it in all health authorities.
    • Two years ago, no one here had employment. Now, it's very common for our patients to be employed. We're scheduling appointments around their work. In 7 years, these are the stories we’ll be telling more of – we're seeing this as our patients’ future now.
    • Crosstown saves lives. So we need more Crosstown.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the table facilitators!

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize

  • MSJ Staff embrace opportunity to guide our next 7 years

    4 months ago
    File3 2

    Mount Saint Joseph Hospital was hopping with engagement activities on Wednesday, November 28!

    The morning and afternoon saw open forum sessions, where lead facilitators Caitlin Grisack, coordinator, Psychological Health & Safety, and Jody Sydor-Jones, corporate director, Mission, Reconciliation & Volunteer Resources, connected with more than 40 MSJ staff – thank you so much to everyone who make the time to attend!

    In addition, the ED staff at MSJ welcomed an early morning pop-up session (AKA: questions and candy) led by Winston MacKenzie, manager, Decision Support, and Elizabeth, corporate director, Care Delivery Integration & Transformation, where meaningful conversations were had around...

    Mount Saint Joseph Hospital was hopping with engagement activities on Wednesday, November 28!

    The morning and afternoon saw open forum sessions, where lead facilitators Caitlin Grisack, coordinator, Psychological Health & Safety, and Jody Sydor-Jones, corporate director, Mission, Reconciliation & Volunteer Resources, connected with more than 40 MSJ staff – thank you so much to everyone who make the time to attend!

    In addition, the ED staff at MSJ welcomed an early morning pop-up session (AKA: questions and candy) led by Winston MacKenzie, manager, Decision Support, and Elizabeth, corporate director, Care Delivery Integration & Transformation, where meaningful conversations were had around quality, safety, and compassion. Big thanks to all staff and medical staff who started your morning with us!

    Here are just a few* of the thoughts that were heard around the tables on the big themes that will guide our organization’s work over the next 7 years:

    · Little things create the big things. It matters how you say good morning.

    · How do we make caring so palpable that you can almost chew on it upon entry to any of our sites?

    · We want everyone to understand and feel that we embrace a culture of inclusiveness. If I was new to this city, I would choose a hospital that catered to my language.

    · There needs to be more flexibility, especially for those with aging parents -- when you know things are taken care of at home, you can focus at work.

    · How we treat each other, how we treat our patients, intentionally weeding out the things that take us off of our vision – this is what will keep us unique.

    · We need to look at how we can create smoother transitions into acute care, if that is where someone needs to be cared for, and if they’re better cared for at home, we need to support that transition better, too. It only takes a little bit of extra time to make a good transition happen.

    · What about a seniors’ rapid access clinic with a dedicated discharge team that could be access without our seniors having to come to ED?

    · As we strive for innovation, we need to evaluate what’s working and what isn’t -- we're good at introducing new things but are they benefiting us in the way that we think they are, or at all?

    · What do we to do to keep ourselves caring and empathetic as the volumes and complexity continues to build?

    · If we want to be world-class, we can't just stay focused on what happening here – exceptional things are happening in the world. We need to expand and see what's working elsewhere.

    · We need to get better at translating knowledge – we’re doing a lot of fantastic research and have access to very current best practice. We need to get good at pulling that into our practice. What about creating a role for champions and respected leaders who can get people excited about new research, and support staff to really embrace best practice and mobilize it across the organization?

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by lead and table facilitators!

    This pop-up was part of a series of engagement activities happening across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019-2026) for the organization.

    Have an idea you want heard? Head to Bloom to offer up your feedback and have your name entered to win some really great prizes (check out the list of what’s up for grabs!).

    See photos from the morning and afternoon sessions:


  • The 7-Year Plan: physicians weigh in

    4 months ago
    Phc physicians weigh in   1

    On November 22, more than 100 physicians met for an evening to discuss their priorities for Providence’s strategic plan for the next seven years. A diverse group of physicians from across Providence ranging from surgeons to radiologists came together with other medical staff and Providence leaders. They shared perspectives, ideas, and goals in five main areas:

    • Provision of exceptional care and outcomes
    • Integration of clinical care, research, and teaching
    • Our people and workplace
    • Seamless care between acute care and community care
    • Maintaining our unique culture

    The passionate discussion generated a number of goals and...

    On November 22, more than 100 physicians met for an evening to discuss their priorities for Providence’s strategic plan for the next seven years. A diverse group of physicians from across Providence ranging from surgeons to radiologists came together with other medical staff and Providence leaders. They shared perspectives, ideas, and goals in five main areas:

    • Provision of exceptional care and outcomes
    • Integration of clinical care, research, and teaching
    • Our people and workplace
    • Seamless care between acute care and community care
    • Maintaining our unique culture

    The passionate discussion generated a number of goals and ideas that will be put forward for consideration as part of the 7-year plan.

    Some reflections include:

    • “There was tons of energy in the room. There was enthusiasm around long term plans, as well as some simple, quick wins that we can build on to harvest that energy, and keep it going forward. – Dr. Neil Wells, President, Medical Staff Association
    • “It was inspiring to hear directly from so many of our medical staff as we develop our plan, and to see 100+ PHC physicians actively engaged in the discussions.” - Deborah Mitchell, VP, Organizational Strategy & Partnership
    • We had to keeping talking louder to hear over the next table. People have things to say and are excited that someone is listening.” – Dr. Chantal Leger, President, PHC Physicians & Surgeons Society

    Physicians who were not able to attend the Nov 22 event are urged to contribute in 1 of 2 ways by December 15:

    Submit your own ideas directly online at Bloom >

    Meet with colleagues in small physician groups. Here’s how.


  • OR Staff Weigh-in On Our Pursuit of World Class

    4 months ago
    Img 20181127 090539

    Tuesday, November 27, saw facilitators Miriam Stewart, chief clinical planning officer, St. Paul’s Redevelopment, and Elizabeth Stanger, corporate director, Care Delivery Integration & Transformation, spending the morning in the OR's staff lunchroom for a come-and-go pop-up session (AKA: questions and candy) around our new strategic plan.

    Operating Room staff were great to swing by, grab a chocolate or granola bar, and offer their thoughts on the big themes that will guide our organization’s work over the next 7 years.

    Here are just a few* of the highlights:

    • Staff work as a team here - there’s not a lot of hierarchy...

    Tuesday, November 27, saw facilitators Miriam Stewart, chief clinical planning officer, St. Paul’s Redevelopment, and Elizabeth Stanger, corporate director, Care Delivery Integration & Transformation, spending the morning in the OR's staff lunchroom for a come-and-go pop-up session (AKA: questions and candy) around our new strategic plan.

    Operating Room staff were great to swing by, grab a chocolate or granola bar, and offer their thoughts on the big themes that will guide our organization’s work over the next 7 years.

    Here are just a few* of the highlights:

    • Staff work as a team here - there’s not a lot of hierarchy between the team members whether it’s a nurse, surgeon, or porter.
    • It would be great to have more part-time positions for people who don't want to work full-time; it would allow more flexibility, and would be a huge step in the right direction.
    • The environment is very welcoming -- new people are shown a lot of patience and the teaching is constant. Surgeons maintain a good attitude to teach new people or help out those who are struggling. Staff in general is very willing to help one another out.
    • When planning the new St. Paul’s, input from clinical staff needs to be incorporated – not just asked for and then discarded. Something as minor as the height of a counter can make a huge difference.
    • I enjoy it here. Regardless of the task, I enjoy it because I like the people.
    • If it's a good room and people feel appreciated, it's easier to learn -- you're not worried about stepping on eggshells.
    • A friend just had surgery here and because of the very positive experience, she's considering health care as a profession.
    • Team Leaders help staff and work directly in the room -- in other places I’ve worked they're doing paperwork and not connected to the work their staff are doing. It makes such a difference to have leadership be tapped into the work being done.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by Elizabeth and Miriam!

    This pop-up was part of a series of engagement activities happening across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019-2026) for the organization.

    Have an idea you want heard? Head to Bloom to offer up your feedback and have your name entered to win some really great prizes (check out the list of what’s up for grabs!).


  • St. Paul's and Hornby staff share their valuable insights

    4 months ago
    Elaine julie st.paul'sforum nov23

    On Friday, November 23, and Saturday, November 24, staff from St. Paul’s and Hornby came together to share their thoughts on the creation of PHC’s new 7-year strategic plan.

    Julie, a patient of the hospital for more than 20 years, also joined the conversation, offering observations based on her positive experiences with Providence and providing a warm reminder of the importance of our patient-centred work. A volunteer with the organization also participated in the forum, adding insightful suggestions based on experiences both as a family member of someone in our care, and as a volunteer.

    Several key insights* came up...

    On Friday, November 23, and Saturday, November 24, staff from St. Paul’s and Hornby came together to share their thoughts on the creation of PHC’s new 7-year strategic plan.

    Julie, a patient of the hospital for more than 20 years, also joined the conversation, offering observations based on her positive experiences with Providence and providing a warm reminder of the importance of our patient-centred work. A volunteer with the organization also participated in the forum, adding insightful suggestions based on experiences both as a family member of someone in our care, and as a volunteer.

    Several key insights* came up during the session when participants were asked to consider the big themes that will guide our organization’s work over the next 7 years.

    • Housing, childcare and parking are significant hurdles for staff.
    • The opioid crisis is taking a toll on our nursing staff; the responsibility falling on staff to prove their anguish needs to be looked at.
    • While we are excellent at pushing the envelope and are known for our innovation, we need to make sure we are still taking care of the basics.
    • To be the best we need to get the best, and provide the best service. Best means: clean, timely and efficient, getting to the bottom of the issue as soon as possible, valuing communication and prioritizing it with patients and their family.
    • We often work in our silos and feel like we don't have time to contribute or don't know where to share ideas and feedback – if there was a clear channel for staff to contribute and see a change, that would be powerful.
    • We need to talk to our patients not as patients, but as people.
    • Our patient population feels very comfortable in our current facility at St. Paul’s. Are we still going to feel as accessible to the most vulnerable people if our campus at Station Street is state-of-the-art and brand new? How comfortable will our patients feel coming through the doors of the new site?
    • We need to explore how we define compassionate care and have a clear process to flag when it’s not happening.
    • We used to have the Sisters living here, which brought a real presence. Being faith-based sets us apart.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the table facilitators!

    This recent Open Forum was part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019-2026) for the organization.

    Share your ideas on how to we should move forward as an organization at one of these upcoming Town Hall or Open Forum events.

    See photos from this engagement session below.