News and Updates

We've designed a number of ways to connect with, and listen to, as many voices and ideas as possible. We can't thank everyone enough for being part of building our 7-year vision.

But we can definitely share the journey!

Stay tuned to this page for the news and updates that capture our story to Providence 2026.


We've designed a number of ways to connect with, and listen to, as many voices and ideas as possible. We can't thank everyone enough for being part of building our 7-year vision.

But we can definitely share the journey!

Stay tuned to this page for the news and updates that capture our story to Providence 2026.


  • Patients and loved ones share their wisdom

    27 days ago
    Feature patients resized

    December 13 saw a group of informed and invested former patients and loved ones share with us what their perception is on our pursuit of world class, what we need to do to retain and recruit the best, how we’re doing with living our values, and what sets us apart.

    Here are a few* of the insights shared that afternoon:

    • Staff at other, non-PHC hospitals seem so focused on “treating” versus realizing that what they're treating is a person.
    • Maybe you can change the names of floors or meeting rooms, or add more art to be more inclusive and symbolically...

    December 13 saw a group of informed and invested former patients and loved ones share with us what their perception is on our pursuit of world class, what we need to do to retain and recruit the best, how we’re doing with living our values, and what sets us apart.

    Here are a few* of the insights shared that afternoon:

    • Staff at other, non-PHC hospitals seem so focused on “treating” versus realizing that what they're treating is a person.
    • Maybe you can change the names of floors or meeting rooms, or add more art to be more inclusive and symbolically represent that people who access the hospitals services?
    • As soon as people enter the hospital, they know they’ll be taken care of. There's a different atmosphere here.
    • The culture has been developed over a long period of time. The uniqueness is that care, that compassion. The environment, even though it's dated, there is something warm about it. At St. Paul's I've never felt that “business” atmosphere.
    • Does management taste the food being delivered to patients?
    • At MSJ, depending on the type of patient that comes in, the whole environment can change. But the staff numbers don't change. It’s a very unpredictable environment with a very rigid way of scheduling. How adaptable are the staff for dealing with that sort of ebb and flow?
    • What about the people who do maintenance, or those who deliver our food? This is an important group to engage. Some of these jobs are contracted out so it’s important to make sure that your contractors are on the same page.
    • Is there a way to pull staff from other areas so that the workload is distributed differently? I think more helping hands would reduce stress asap.
    • What needs to be looked at more closely is the organization’s expectations on the workload that people carry. I don't know how we expect people to compassionate and caring when they working all of these hours.
    • If hospitals were a business we would have gone bankrupt. That people are handwriting physician notes or that transferring a patient's information across health authorities can’t happen is absurd. It's a safety issue as far as I'm concerned.
    • Being able to see updates on your own health, or be able to access updates to a loved one’s file in real time would diminish stress and free up staff time because we wouldn't be hounding staff for information. If I had been able to get my discharge plan ahead of my discharge, then there wouldn't be any confusion.
    • I'm not aware how much the public knows about St. Paul's being world class. For those of us who have been there, we know. But for most people, it's this rundown hospital downtown and for those who have never been there, they likely never want to go. How well is the story of St. Paul’s being told?

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!


    Formal in-person engagement activities have now come to an end – however, not to worry! Bloom has been extended so that we can continue to capture more great ideas and comments until December 31 – so whether it’s on shift, at home, in the line-up at the grocery store, head to bloomprovidencehealthcare.org and let us know what will make the next years at Providence meaningful to you.

    Thank you again for making the first phase of creating our way forward a success.

    Find out more about engagement over the past 5 weeks.


  • Seriously, thank you

    29 days ago
    Feature image thank you resized

    Huge thank you to everyone who added their voice to, facilitated the conversations around, and showed up for our pursuit of world class.

    it was an amazing 5 weeks of connecting with everyone across the organization, and here's to a continued inspired and meaningful journey together towards our 7-year strategic plan, and Providence 2026. Read more about this week in engagement, and the insights that we heard.


    Huge thank you to everyone who added their voice to, facilitated the conversations around, and showed up for our pursuit of world class.

    it was an amazing 5 weeks of connecting with everyone across the organization, and here's to a continued inspired and meaningful journey together towards our 7-year strategic plan, and Providence 2026. Read more about this week in engagement, and the insights that we heard.


  • 10C adds their voice

    29 days ago
    10c engagement feature resize

    On December 7, an engagement pop-up on 10C (where we bring questions and candy to the unit) created a lot of chatter, feedback and ideas.

    Here is just a snippet* of what was discussed with staff that afternoon:

    • PHC is just world class without trying. Take Crosstown – across the world other colleagues are coming in to see the clinic before they set up their own.
    • It’s a different model of care here – we use a flexible model, trauma-informed care and believe it should be embedded into hiring practices where all staff understand this approach to care.
    • ...

    On December 7, an engagement pop-up on 10C (where we bring questions and candy to the unit) created a lot of chatter, feedback and ideas.

    Here is just a snippet* of what was discussed with staff that afternoon:

    • PHC is just world class without trying. Take Crosstown – across the world other colleagues are coming in to see the clinic before they set up their own.
    • It’s a different model of care here – we use a flexible model, trauma-informed care and believe it should be embedded into hiring practices where all staff understand this approach to care.
    • We’re one of the only acute units in Canada to work with people with substance abuse
    • We should embed harm reduction into our care policy.
    • We doing everything on the fly. It would be helpful to have plans and procedures formalized and put on paper to be able to share with other provinces, countries.
    • We could increase our capacity to world class by sharing how we treat our patient population. Currently I don’t have a package that I can send to other people that outlines all of our data, care plans, nursing case standards, specific programming, etc. We are doing incredible stuff. It would be good to share it.
    • In terms of our patients’ experience, we are very proactive and flexible in how our nurses are trained.
    • People are actively using and we provide harm reduction supplies and have open conversations. No punitive approach or judgmental approach.
    • We are world class in the implementation of the OPS (overdose prevention site) at St. Paul’s. The Royal Alex Hospital [in Edmonton] has a similar one but we are the only one in Canada that is low barrier, i.e., people don't even need to give their name. This will need to be part of the new St. Paul's.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!

    Formal in-person engagement activities have now come to an end – however, not to worry! Bloom has been extended so that we can continue to capture more great ideas and comments until December 31 – so whether it’s on shift, at home, in the line-up at the grocery store, head to bloomprovidencehealthcare.org and let us know what will make the next years at Providence meaningful to you.

    Thank you again for making the first phase of creating our way forward a success.

    Find out more about engagement over the past 5 weeks.


  • Langara Staff and Family & Resident Council Provide Invaluable Feedback

    about 1 month ago
    Langara townhall resized bloom

    It’s pretty powerful to hear what can be discovered and talked about when a range voices are at the table, as evidenced by Langara’s town hall on November 27.

    Many insights were offered and several pages of takeaways were noted, thanks to the participation of both staff, and members of Langara’s Family and Residents’ Council and everyone’s willingness to share and unite in the common goal of elevating what’s possible at Langara, and at Providence Health Care.


    Below are just some* of the comments and feedback collected from that evening’s large-group discussion:

    It’s pretty powerful to hear what can be discovered and talked about when a range voices are at the table, as evidenced by Langara’s town hall on November 27.

    Many insights were offered and several pages of takeaways were noted, thanks to the participation of both staff, and members of Langara’s Family and Residents’ Council and everyone’s willingness to share and unite in the common goal of elevating what’s possible at Langara, and at Providence Health Care.


    Below are just some* of the comments and feedback collected from that evening’s large-group discussion:

    • A world class experience means creating a high standard of food quality and facility cleanliness.
    • When a patient is dying, we would like time when they are taking their last breaths.
    • Can we be sent for language training so that as much as possible, our language capabilities match those of the residents?
    • Time and resources should be available for sharing concerns between groups: family relations, nursing, admin and employees.
    • Is it possible to have a spiritual leader like a Buddhist monk, who speaks the same language as the residents?
    • We would like to spend more time talking with residents, doing art, having tea. We want to share our unique gifts with them.
    • Provide support for the people who serve my family member.
    • Have residents and staff involved in the cooking. Bring the smells of food cooking into the facility instead of just receiving it on a tray.
    • I need to feel that I can go to my work and my loved one is going to be taken care of, and not to take time off work to be able to navigate all the broken system.
    • Moving your loved one into a care facility is a very emotional time; I need to feel supported.
    • Invest in your people to go and experience other hospitals/locations and bring the learnings and make us world-class competitive.
    • 75% of the residents are Chinese so we need pastoral care to speak different languages.
    • Ensure there is support for staff when a resident passes away. And also let other residents know and talk about it, they need to know that a neighbour or a friend has passed away.
    • Have a place for staff where they can go and disconnect and rest, and re-energize to continue with the long days.
    • Open and transparent conversation is key.
    • In the future, it would be good if residents are grouped based on their abilities. And that the same staff are looking after the residents on a consistent basis.
    • Ways in which Langara can be world class:
    1. Machine therapy – robot dogs, cats, etc. that residents can interact with;
    2. The Butterfly Household Model of Care that was founded by Dr David Sheard;
    3. Cordless headphones for residents to listen to – a type of music therapy.
    • Quality standards impacting PHC’s world class reputation involve two key issues: quality and quantity of food/meals for residents, and security at the front door.
    • Each Providence site should have a Family/Resident Council and the Councils should meet together regularly to discuss issues, share and learn from each other, and to take collective action and make their voice heard.
    • Have a “floater” position, someone who goes around and just helps a resident when needed, that’s all they do.
    • Leaders are very supportive and I can ask any questions and we can discuss any problem.
    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the table facilitators!

    This town hall at Langara was part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers were invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Our period of formal, large-group engagement has wrapped up but, not to worry!


  • Corporate Services Offer Up Insights

    about 1 month ago
    Feature corpservice resize

    The morning of December 12 saw 25 people from across OH&S, HR, Redevelopment, Communications, Finance cycle through a large-group discussion held at Hornby Street office for our corporate services staff. As those who provide support for our point of care staff and leadership, their insights ranged from how to better make staff more aware of the supports in place for them, to what makes them proud to support this work, to where they see opportunities in our way forward.

    Below are some* of the highlights heard in the room that day:

    The morning of December 12 saw 25 people from across OH&S, HR, Redevelopment, Communications, Finance cycle through a large-group discussion held at Hornby Street office for our corporate services staff. As those who provide support for our point of care staff and leadership, their insights ranged from how to better make staff more aware of the supports in place for them, to what makes them proud to support this work, to where they see opportunities in our way forward.

    Below are some* of the highlights heard in the room that day:

    • We communicate what we’re doing in little groups or through one-off communication, but we need to have it be organization-wide so staff know all of the work we're doing for them and what resources are available to them. People don't know about the support and services available to them until they need them -- maybe an app would help to get information to our staff, quick, about the services and supports we have in place for them?
    • Staff are trying to be diligent about finding information at home and can't because of the intranet being behind the firewall and being hard to navigate. The search isn't comprehensive, nothing relevant comes up, the documents are hard to find and are outdated. It’s a barrier.
    • It only takes about six people with boldness and courage to positively transform a workplace, culture and system. And we have those people; this brings me hope.
    • We have the same number of staff as Northern Health – people always say that we’re able to get things done because we’re small; I would say that we get things done because we're nimble and innovative.
    • We need to come up with a process on how we live these values internally. We do a lot of engagement and values translation with our patients but not necessarily internally.
    • I'd like us to take some more risks. If we want to be unique, we need to do unique things and dedicate time to reflect on this.
    • The corporate vision has been changing a lot, and I don't think the frontline connect to it or understand it anymore.
    • Wellness for staff needs to be prioritized in the same way that research or technical skills are. In health care this is a new concept. Shifting our culture to show staff that their wellness is important, that we're making time for it and creating space for it, that it goes beyond just accessing their benefits but transcends to how they’re able to take care of themselves while on shift – this leadership would make us world class.
    • You don't need a big budget to do stuff like verbally recognize your staff, or pull them aside to check in -- it's just remembering to do stuff like that.
    • Continue to advocate and be thought-leaders that challenge stigma and perception, all the way from grassroots to political leaders.
    • If we want to be known as the hospital that looks after those in the Downtown Eastside, let’s get known for that. Self-promotion equals more resources and support from the community. We are the little train that could have a bigger voice.
    • I connect with the mission. That’s why I came here and that’s why I stay.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!

    This recent session with Corporate Services staff was part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers were invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Our period of formal, large-group engagement has wrapped up but, not to worry!

    Bloom is open for business (and by business, we mean big ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class) until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs:

    https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize



  • St. John Hospice adds their voice

    about 1 month ago
    Stjohnhospice feature resize2
    Staff at St. John Hospice gathered on December 12 to share, among other insights regarding our pursuit of world class, what they saw as our standout qualities when it comes to attracting the best to come and work at PHC.

    Here are just a few* of the soundbites:
    • We don’t say no, we say how.
    • We are very inclusive. We find what is important to the person and we’ll do what we can to make it meaningful to them.
    • Every health authority has values -- PHC is the first one where I...

    Staff at St. John Hospice gathered on December 12 to share, among other insights regarding our pursuit of world class, what they saw as our standout qualities when it comes to attracting the best to come and work at PHC.

    Here are just a few* of the soundbites:
    • We don’t say no, we say how.
    • We are very inclusive. We find what is important to the person and we’ll do what we can to make it meaningful to them.
    • Every health authority has values -- PHC is the first one where I feel like they are being followed. All the other health authorities say “patient-centered care” and at PHC we actually do it.
    • I had orientation in four different health authorities and Providence was the best. It was inspiring and thorough. With other health authorities, it didn’t hit you in the heart.
    • I found my home here. It’s the first time I felt my opinion mattered.
    • Hopefully Providence doesn’t lose the sense that your voice matters – I have definitely worked in places where that’s not the case.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!

    This recent session with staff at St. John Hospice was part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers were invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Our period of formal, large-group engagement has wrapped up but, not to worry!

    Bloom is open for business (and by business, we mean big ideas ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class) until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs:

    https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize


  • Highlights from the Diabetes Health Centre team

    about 1 month ago
    Feature resized diabetes

    Monday, December 10 saw a number of staff from Diabetes Health Centre at St. Paul’s stop by and offer up their insights, both from the perspective of their role as well as from a system and transformation point of view.


    Below are just a few* highlights from ideas and feedback that this team added to our pursuit of world class:

    • I think we support our patients really well -- we embrace patients who are more challenging and offer them flexibility and compassion, whereas other organizations might turn them away or not offer the same accommodation.
    • It’s important to...

    Monday, December 10 saw a number of staff from Diabetes Health Centre at St. Paul’s stop by and offer up their insights, both from the perspective of their role as well as from a system and transformation point of view.


    Below are just a few* highlights from ideas and feedback that this team added to our pursuit of world class:

    • I think we support our patients really well -- we embrace patients who are more challenging and offer them flexibility and compassion, whereas other organizations might turn them away or not offer the same accommodation.
    • It’s important to try to be an open accepting space where patients feel safe to share; it allows us to build that rapport and eliminate the power dynamic.
    • Too much decision-making that directly impacts departments gets done without engagement with that department.
    • If you don't have enough staff, you don't have enough time to go the extra mile. Not to be understaffed is the key thing. We're just going to get busier so I think the organization really needs to keep on top of volume and staff programs accordingly. If you can talk to patients more and have more time to understand what they need, we could triage more effectively. It's about getting more information from our patients and finding out what the exact issue is.
    • I’ve worked in two health authorities and I found it was harder to go through the system here to be on-boarded as an employee here, e.g., having to get an ID, email set-up, etc.
    • Work-life balance, especially for parents, is lacking. It's hard to maintain balance if there is no part-time roles. If I had a part-time line, I feel like that would make a difference for me.
    • St. Paul’s Foundation has been very supportive to help us buy things that we've needed.
    • I find that there are a lot of opportunities for growth and education, and people are encouraged to move around and grow. I think that's why people stay here.
    • I think it's good that the CEO moved to St. Paul’s. She can really see what happens here that way.
    • Working in different clinics has shown me that there are many different processes for getting to the same result. One clinic does it one way and one does it another. Consistency across our processes would help.
    • We are one of the first to have an insulin pump program. First the technology came on the scene and then Health Canada started to cover it for adults. But then there was a gap because in the past you would have been trained by the company supplying the pumps. And so we recognized this gap for our patients, created a solution and were a leader in this area.
    • Before patients couldn't go out and buy a pill – but now they can go out and buy technology. We have patients who are buying Apple watches and are coming to us to know how this can support their care. We need to stay on top of it and know how to use it. Technology will mean we will need to partner with private companies to understand how we can support our patients.
    • I think if we had more funding, our patients would be more autonomous. I think 90% of patients forget what they're taught so if they were able to access something that could prompt or remind them, it would lead to empowerment.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitator!


    This recent session with Diabetes Health Centre staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.


  • Eating disorders program help to guide PHC's future

    about 1 month ago
    Ed pop up feature resize2

    On the afternoon of December 7, staff from the provincial adult tertiary eating disorders program, which is housed at St. Paul's, came and went during a 2-hour pop-up engagement session (i.e., when we bring candy and questions to the unit).

    From suggestions on how staff can make care more real for their patients, to the research they're proud of, to where they see opportunities to grow, clinical and medical staff came to the table with many great ideas.

    Here is just a snippet*:

    • We need to bring the health care we're teaching here out into the community.

    • I think what...

    On the afternoon of December 7, staff from the provincial adult tertiary eating disorders program, which is housed at St. Paul's, came and went during a 2-hour pop-up engagement session (i.e., when we bring candy and questions to the unit).

    From suggestions on how staff can make care more real for their patients, to the research they're proud of, to where they see opportunities to grow, clinical and medical staff came to the table with many great ideas.

    Here is just a snippet*:

    • We need to bring the health care we're teaching here out into the community.

    • I think what could make us world class in the next seven years is developing our understanding of men and body image, and creating specific programming around it -- we are seeing more and more men come through but I've only seen one pamphlet dedicated specifically to men and eating disorders.

    • There is a big research component to our program -- when someone is first referred we ask them to complete a survey and again when they're taken in as an inpatient, and again when they're discharged so that we can improve based on this patient feedback. An example of this improvement is patient participation rounds: The psychiatrist, psychologist, social worker -- the whole team is present and participates. We're now also writing down the feedback shared during rounds for our patients because of survey insights. We were realizing that it was just the negative that our patients were holding onto and we wanted to make sure they that they saw all of the good being said about them, too.

    • We’re the only provincial tertiary-level resource for eating disorders, and through that we run a comprehensive provincial program for BC and the Yukon. Our program is very research-informed and evidence-based, and our staff are seconded to write the BC clinical guidelines for eating disorders, which we get international calls about. We're both medical and psychiatric, which makes us fairly unique, with 3 internists who rotate through here, and are available 24/7. Everyone probably knows we're doing cardiac transplants, but do they know we have the only adult provincial inpatient program? More institutional visibility would be really valuable.

    • This hospital is colourful; it serves all walks of life -- we accept everyone. That's what I like about it.

    • It would be great if we were able to do our own cooking for our patients so that they could have more input. The hospital only has so many food options.

    • Providing patients with immersion experiences that will help them navigate real-life situations like going out for dinner or experiencing social events -- those situations that are really anxiety-ridden for our patients -- would set us apart. It would be more money but at the end of the day if you work towards recovery and keep a patient out of inpatient and in recovery, the additional cost for these types of experiences would be worth it.

    • It sometimes feels like a lot of people in the organization don't even know we’re here. We are kind of invisible, like we get forgotten about when it comes to distributing certain supplies like whiteboards at bedside.

    • I put out one email and I get 20 replies. It sounds cheesy but it's very friendly here -- like a family.

    • What I've learned here is the necessity of matching right patient, right care, right time.

    • Feel of a community hospital with all of the services. I know the docs who I need to contact with, and it's very easy to facilitate these conversations.

    • Our unit has a great housekeeper but the rest of the hospital isn't that. The patients that have been cared for here, or the staff can look past it -- but your first impression of this hospital is far from great; abysmal, even.

    • I think that regardless of your position you are encouraged to contribute and be part of the organization and the work here. The hospital doesn't feel elitist.

    * please note: this is a high-level summary; all sentiments discussed were fully captured by the facilitators!


    This recent session with Eating Disorders Program staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize




  • Researchers share their vision for the future of PHC

    about 1 month ago
    Research session


    On December 7, members of the Providence Health Care research community gathered in the Gourlay conference room at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital for coffee, lunch and a very important conversation about the future of our organization.

    After a presentation about PHC’s 7-year strategic plan, participants broke into groups to discuss several big questions that will guide our organization’s work until 2026.

    Several key insights came up during the engagement session:

    • Active clinical programs are necessary in order to study patients and we have to brand ourselves as a good place to do clinical research.
    • ...


    On December 7, members of the Providence Health Care research community gathered in the Gourlay conference room at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital for coffee, lunch and a very important conversation about the future of our organization.

    After a presentation about PHC’s 7-year strategic plan, participants broke into groups to discuss several big questions that will guide our organization’s work until 2026.

    Several key insights came up during the engagement session:

    • Active clinical programs are necessary in order to study patients and we have to brand ourselves as a good place to do clinical research.
    • We have an inquisitive and collaborative environment and should maintain this.
    • The new St. Paul’s must consider space for research and research expansion. We should work with UBC as we build the new research facility.
    • There’s no way SPH can do everything, so we must focus on set clinical areas (i.e. heart/lung, HIV/AIDS) and use those patients to advance research.
    • It’s important to maintain our areas of research specialization, otherwise we will have to compete for funding and resources with other institutions.
    • Encourage temporary students and post-docs to stay before they move on to other research institutions.
    • To retain good people, we need salary support for mid- and senior-level investigators. Younger generations of researchers are attracted to work with senior researchers they admire.
    • Patient access at St. Paul’s is good and we are able to conduct clinical trials well here. We wouldn’t be able to conduct clinical trials as well outside the hospital.
    • We have to be physically connected to the hospital and clinicians and researchers must work on the same site. UBC is a “dead zone” clinically because there is poor patient access.

    * Please note: these are but a few of the comments heard and ideas discussed - all sentiments were fully captured by the facilitators and will be rolled up into the findings shared with SLT.

    This recent session with researchers and research staff is part of a series of facilitated engagement sessions across PHC where employees, patients, residents, family members, clinicians, researchers and volunteers are invited to weigh in on the creation of a new 7-year strategic plan (2019 - 2026) for the organization.

    Do you have ideas that you’d like to contribute to our pursuit of world class? Tell us online until December 31! https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/

    Registering on Bloom adds your voice to this important conversation, and enters your name in a draw to win some excellent prizes. See what’s up for grabs: https://bloomprovidencehealthcare.org/story-page-test/news_feed/add-your-voice-win-a-prize


  • COG collaborates on our way forward

    about 1 month ago
    Feature image group resize

    On December 5, our Clinical Operations Group (COG) opened up time on their agenda to have a dedicated conversation around our 7-year strategic plan, and what needs to happen between now and 2026 for our pursuit of world class to feel like a success.

    Across four tables, more than 20 leaders reflected on what’s working, what’s not working, and shared the ideas on how to bridge the gap between the two.

    Several key insights * came up during the session:

    • Cost of living will be a challenge going forward. Affordable housing, onsite and/or subsidized daycare, parking that’s strategically placed --...

    On December 5, our Clinical Operations Group (COG) opened up time on their agenda to have a dedicated conversation around our 7-year strategic plan, and what needs to happen between now and 2026 for our pursuit of world class to feel like a success.

    Across four tables, more than 20 leaders reflected on what’s working, what’s not working, and shared the ideas on how to bridge the gap between the two.

    Several key insights * came up during the session:

    • Cost of living will be a challenge going forward. Affordable housing, onsite and/or subsidized daycare, parking that’s strategically placed -- maybe even free for staff? – placed all the way along the street to the new hospital.
    • There are a lot of pockets where research is being done but we're not bringing this work out on a national or international stage. Because of funding, people are very hesitant to travel for conferences. We're limiting ourselves.
    • This is a really hard place to work but we know everyone has one another's backs.
    • Fiona's blog makes me feel valued in the work that I do. She sees the importance of the soft, the intangible touches of our work.
    • We've become very innovative in tackling issues even if it's not what everyone else might do; we're responsive. Providence is willing to go the extra mile, jump in, and honour our commitment to social justice.
    • We honour our history and it is a point of pride for us. I still feel a lot of pride about how we responded to the HIV/AIDS crisis.
    • Financial performance is our biggest risk.
    • There are so many competing priorities. We're told to be innovative but then there’s always another ask or more work. It feels like mixed messages.
    • We provide care and nurture the spiritual beliefs of everyone, regardless of their faith. We need to be clear on that. We create space for everyone’s spirituality.
    • In the media, there are a lot of stories about the things that we don’t do that could potentially turn people off of the need for Catholic health care. We need to message that it’s not that we don't do it -- we just facilitate other ways of accomplishing our patients’ wishes.
    • It's about the whole person -- it's an observational difference.
    • We have compassion and social justice at the forefront, so it gives us a gateway into that type of care. This sets us apart from what is traditionally delivered in health care.
    • Be proactive, versus reactive.
    • Important for us to look at our current workforce and be able to offer more flexibility, whether that’s job-sharing or different shifts rotations.
    • Build connections with community where we're not just about medical connections but social ones. We see a person, and all of the factors that make-up their health.
    • All of us should be employees of the organization.
    • Yes, we do provide care to a unique population – but to do that effectively, we need to support our people. And if they don't feel that support here, then they're just coming to their shift to punch in and get a paycheque but they're not doing anything extra.
    • In-the-moment recognition is important. Maybe every program has a slush fund that we can use to buy gift cards or coffees to recognize others with?
    • Some programs have money for professional development and other areas say no. That impacts culture.
    • Thinking about palliative care as a model of care that's integrated with other services, encompasses a person's health goals. An upstream, complementary approach.
    • There's a lot of rah-rah but if you talk to someone who is giving care on the front line that likely isn’t their perception.
    • So much happens here in silos. Like dissemination of information. Or different pockets of money for different programs. The specialty areas are focused on their single population but not what's going on across the organization. It creates a have-have-not environment.
    * Please note: these are but a few of the comments heard and ideas discussed - all sentiments were fully captured by the lead and table facilitators and will be rolled up into the findings shared with SLT.

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