Your one-stop shop for all things Providence 2026

Thank you for being part of our pursuit of world class. 

Engagement has now closed, and our Mission: Forward strategic plan has launched. See missionforward.ca for all of the details! 

This week in engagement findings: how we connect the dots

The research that was done in the lead-up to last fall’s engagement – i.e., reviewing of previous surveys, reports, assessments, stats, etc. – informed the themes captured in the 5-minute and 15-minute summaries and gave insight into the areas where you’ve already told us that PHC is doing well, where PHC can get better, and ideas you had to bridge the gap between.

Using these insights, four questions were crafted to dig a bit deeper into some of the areas where we needed more of your input to help put together a 7-year plan that will pave the way to Providence 2026. Those questions explored our people, our vision, our uniqueness, and our pursuit of world class.

This week we’re shining a light on the last bucket of feedback that we heard consistently from you last fall: how we connect the dots here at Providence, via partnerships, relationships and technology.

How we connect the dots

Seamless patient transfers, better inroads into community resources, sustainable funding sources – these types of objectives largely came through as needing to be accomplished via – more, improved, unique, sometimes unconventional – partnerships. So, regardless of the application of it, partnerships are were discussed as a keen key enabler to improving the experience for those we serve, and paving our world-class way forward.

Technology was also consistently mentioned as an element necessary to keep Providence on the forefront of exceptional care, as well as being what underpins much of the work that staff, medical staff and researchers hope to tackle. From the very basic, like wanting site-wide wi-fi, to speculating on what CST will enable, to aspiring to a virtual-health world, technology is on pretty much everyone’s radar.

And relationships – as they relate to our work with community partners, external funding partners, our patients and families, St. Paul’s Foundation and with one another – was a term used throughout conversations had across the organization last fall.

It seems fitting that these three themes be grouped together – they’re all about how we go about connecting. You need relationships to have partnerships, and both relationships and partnerships are better enabled in this day and age via technology.

Here are just some of the soundbites we heard from you last fall that highlight your thoughts on how we need to connect via partnerships, relationships and technology:

  • “Our history of collaboration with UBC, SFU, VCH and PHSA have garnered a national and international reputation for Providence that should be encouraged and endorsed by leadership. Health care in Canada requires huge investments in technology, innovation and research. Providence can continue to be at the forefront through the continued prioritization and support of our proponents and advocates of research and development. – Bloom comment
  • “Integrated EMR information, connection across acute and community care, virtual care initiatives, easy access to full information is needed for seamless care.” Physician, PHC
  • “Build a patient portal that allows patients to make appointments and download educational material, as well as enables outpatient visits via device or computer.” – Bloom comment
  • “Sometimes I think that technology is seen as the opposite of building relationships so it can be worrisome that technology will get in the way of a personal relationship, like say between a care provider and a patient – but we know that if we get it right, it’s absolutely the opposite. Technology enables the relationship. How do we all maintain relationship in a busy world or in our personal life? We use technology.” – Fiona Dalton, President & CEO, PHC
  • Improve collaboration with community & housing services to prevent patients being discharged to overnight shelters or the street at night. – Bloom comment
  • “Very interested in furthering opportunities to have patients have access to their own health records.” – Staff member, HIM
  • Being able to see updates on your own health, or be able to access updates to a loved one’s file in real time would diminish stress and free up staff time because we wouldn't be hounding staff for information. If I had been able to get my discharge plan ahead of my discharge, then there wouldn't be any confusion – Patient
  • “More technology. Not just in how we do the clinical work but how we run the hospital. We still use fax and use pagers. We don’t move forward fast. We’ve been trying for fifteen years. We need things like video conferencing, access to data.” Staff member, PHC
  • “There is a lack of community resources and patients end up coming back because of this – it creates a bit of a revolving door.” – Staff member, Holy Family
  • “We provide our patients with medication; it would be effective if we were able to serve their other primary care needs. For example, if one of our patients has a wound and needs to go to the clinic, they may not be comfortable in that setting and not know that they have to check in, and so end up waiting for 2 hours and then leave without getting the care their need and feel unhappy about the experience, versus here we know and have a relationship with them and so their experience would be far more positive.” Staff member, Crosstown Clinic
  • “We need the ability to monitor our senior patients at home. We currently use pedometers but can we develop some apps? The aging population is getting increasingly more tech-savvy. However, the technology should not replace the family support because family does things that technology can’t. Needs to complement one another and not replace.” – Staff member, Holy Family

Today's post marks our last -- we've been on a mission these past few weeks to report back* to you on the consistent themes that were heard during last fall's strategic planning engagement activities. While what was shared was just the tip of the iceberg in terms of ideas gathered and conversations had, we hope that it's provided you with insight into what was being talked about throughout the organization.

We’re on a journey to some pretty exciting things over the next seven years – and next week we will be officially launch the strategic directions, supporting goals, and foundational principles that YOU helped inform. Stay tuned to PHC News for The Big Reveal!! (and while you're at it, why not check out the schedule for organization-wide launch events, and see when President & CEO Fiona Dalton is coming to your site to rollout the new plan! http://phcnews.ca/news/big-reveal)

Please don’t hesitate to be in touch: Providence2026@providencehealth.bc.ca

* Haven’t had a chance to read up on what has been shared these past few weeks? Don’t wait another minute!

This week in engagement findings: how we connect the dots

The research that was done in the lead-up to last fall’s engagement – i.e., reviewing of previous surveys, reports, assessments, stats, etc. – informed the themes captured in the 5-minute and 15-minute summaries and gave insight into the areas where you’ve already told us that PHC is doing well, where PHC can get better, and ideas you had to bridge the gap between.

Using these insights, four questions were crafted to dig a bit deeper into some of the areas where we needed more of your input to help put together a 7-year plan that will pave the way to Providence 2026. Those questions explored our people, our vision, our uniqueness, and our pursuit of world class.

This week we’re shining a light on the last bucket of feedback that we heard consistently from you last fall: how we connect the dots here at Providence, via partnerships, relationships and technology.

How we connect the dots

Seamless patient transfers, better inroads into community resources, sustainable funding sources – these types of objectives largely came through as needing to be accomplished via – more, improved, unique, sometimes unconventional – partnerships. So, regardless of the application of it, partnerships are were discussed as a keen key enabler to improving the experience for those we serve, and paving our world-class way forward.

Technology was also consistently mentioned as an element necessary to keep Providence on the forefront of exceptional care, as well as being what underpins much of the work that staff, medical staff and researchers hope to tackle. From the very basic, like wanting site-wide wi-fi, to speculating on what CST will enable, to aspiring to a virtual-health world, technology is on pretty much everyone’s radar.

And relationships – as they relate to our work with community partners, external funding partners, our patients and families, St. Paul’s Foundation and with one another – was a term used throughout conversations had across the organization last fall.

It seems fitting that these three themes be grouped together – they’re all about how we go about connecting. You need relationships to have partnerships, and both relationships and partnerships are better enabled in this day and age via technology.

Here are just some of the soundbites we heard from you last fall that highlight your thoughts on how we need to connect via partnerships, relationships and technology:

  • “Our history of collaboration with UBC, SFU, VCH and PHSA have garnered a national and international reputation for Providence that should be encouraged and endorsed by leadership. Health care in Canada requires huge investments in technology, innovation and research. Providence can continue to be at the forefront through the continued prioritization and support of our proponents and advocates of research and development. – Bloom comment
  • “Integrated EMR information, connection across acute and community care, virtual care initiatives, easy access to full information is needed for seamless care.” Physician, PHC
  • “Build a patient portal that allows patients to make appointments and download educational material, as well as enables outpatient visits via device or computer.” – Bloom comment
  • “Sometimes I think that technology is seen as the opposite of building relationships so it can be worrisome that technology will get in the way of a personal relationship, like say between a care provider and a patient – but we know that if we get it right, it’s absolutely the opposite. Technology enables the relationship. How do we all maintain relationship in a busy world or in our personal life? We use technology.” – Fiona Dalton, President & CEO, PHC
  • Improve collaboration with community & housing services to prevent patients being discharged to overnight shelters or the street at night. – Bloom comment
  • “Very interested in furthering opportunities to have patients have access to their own health records.” – Staff member, HIM
  • Being able to see updates on your own health, or be able to access updates to a loved one’s file in real time would diminish stress and free up staff time because we wouldn't be hounding staff for information. If I had been able to get my discharge plan ahead of my discharge, then there wouldn't be any confusion – Patient
  • “More technology. Not just in how we do the clinical work but how we run the hospital. We still use fax and use pagers. We don’t move forward fast. We’ve been trying for fifteen years. We need things like video conferencing, access to data.” Staff member, PHC
  • “There is a lack of community resources and patients end up coming back because of this – it creates a bit of a revolving door.” – Staff member, Holy Family
  • “We provide our patients with medication; it would be effective if we were able to serve their other primary care needs. For example, if one of our patients has a wound and needs to go to the clinic, they may not be comfortable in that setting and not know that they have to check in, and so end up waiting for 2 hours and then leave without getting the care their need and feel unhappy about the experience, versus here we know and have a relationship with them and so their experience would be far more positive.” Staff member, Crosstown Clinic
  • “We need the ability to monitor our senior patients at home. We currently use pedometers but can we develop some apps? The aging population is getting increasingly more tech-savvy. However, the technology should not replace the family support because family does things that technology can’t. Needs to complement one another and not replace.” – Staff member, Holy Family

Today's post marks our last -- we've been on a mission these past few weeks to report back* to you on the consistent themes that were heard during last fall's strategic planning engagement activities. While what was shared was just the tip of the iceberg in terms of ideas gathered and conversations had, we hope that it's provided you with insight into what was being talked about throughout the organization.

We’re on a journey to some pretty exciting things over the next seven years – and next week we will be officially launch the strategic directions, supporting goals, and foundational principles that YOU helped inform. Stay tuned to PHC News for The Big Reveal!! (and while you're at it, why not check out the schedule for organization-wide launch events, and see when President & CEO Fiona Dalton is coming to your site to rollout the new plan! http://phcnews.ca/news/big-reveal)

Please don’t hesitate to be in touch: Providence2026@providencehealth.bc.ca

* Haven’t had a chance to read up on what has been shared these past few weeks? Don’t wait another minute!